FOUR: Woodwork by BROOKE WADE

  Extra Large Twig Spoon This walnut mixing spoon has an extra long handle and a faceted bowl. The end of the handle resembles a twig from the forest floor. Two in stock.*

 

Extra Large Twig Spoon

This walnut mixing spoon has an extra long handle and a faceted bowl. The end of the handle resembles a twig from the forest floor. Two in stock.*

Walnut Raindrop Spoon

This mixing spoon has a strong, straight grain and a delicate raindrop detail at the end of the handle. Made from fragment walnut gathered in Brooklyn*

 

 Where do you get the materials you use (if relevant).

From all across the country! Reclaimed materials with history are super important to me, and so I make a point to travel to interesting places and meet people who have a special connection to some wood. My most recent excursion was to Down East Maine, where I stayed in a house built by a local family. The wife/mother is a professor in environmental studies, and the husband/father builds boats and timber-frame homes when he’s not fishing salmon in Alaska from June-August. After my visit, they sent me home with some wonderful pieces like sustainably harvested boat-building silverballi, and ribs of teak from the hull of Betsy, the WWII era boat that they lived on for six years.

 

What is something interesting special no one would know about your goods just by looking at them?

The origin stories that are inherent in every piece! If anyone is curious about the wood that became their serving board or spoon, they should check out the “Collections” page on my website or my blog. I try to tell many the stories there.